Philomena (2013)

Genre: Drama

Director: Stephen Frears

Writers: Steve Coogan, Jeff Pope, Martin Sixsmith

Starring: Steve Coogan, Judi Dench, Sophie Kennedy Clark

Rating: ★★★★½

To my surprise this somewhat under the radar film is moving, sad and quite simply brilliant. Philomena a small British film has only recently been making the headlines and dominating conversations after receiving a handful of nominations for award season including an Oscar nomination for Best Motion Picture and Best Actress. It isn’t any surprise however why these nominations were given to Philomena as for me a mixture of a well-written emotional story and great acting by Coogan and Dench really make this release as enjoyable and entertaining as any other film causing hype at the moment.

Martin Sixsmith (Steve Coogan) is a journalist looking for a distraction after finding himself at a loss when dismissed by the Labour Party leaving his career as a member of the BBC a mere shameful memory. When approach by a young Irish woman Martin is intrigued by the story of her mother, Philomena (Judi Dench) who is on a search for her long lost son who was taken by Nuns when she was an inmate at a strict Catholic convent. Martin agrees to help Philomena with her search and with her story he will write and publish in a magazine; however their journey and her story is more than just a magazine article. On the hunt for Philomena’s lost Anthony they find themselves in America and discovering a shameful corruption and lie within the Catholic convent. However as much as they find out about the fate of Anthony Martin and Philomena find out a lot about each other forming a close friendship which causes even their basic beliefs to be changed.

The story which is based on a true story and adapted from Martin Sixsmith’s book “The Lost Child of Philomena Lee” is not only well-written but emotional containing witty British comedy to tearful moments of sadness. There’s a scene which takes place in a Harvester Restaurant which immediately brings laughs to the British audience, picking up a handful of croutons in her Irish accent Philomena says to Martin “Oh I do like these little bits of toast they have”.  It was only a simple moment and simple joke yet it was so effective and free-flowing and that was the case for the comedy throughout the film. In the complete contrary there are scenes where your heart drops, no matter how Philomena discovers her long lost son Anthony is was destined to be emotional and it truly was and was executed greatly and captured by Judi Dench equally as impressive.

Although at times it was a pleasant story and had moments of heart-warming bonding and comedy it did show the harsh truth and untold stories of what young Catholic women had to obey once upon time. How young-girls were shunned upon and disowned by their parents if they got pregnant is upsetting and more so was the idea that the only options they had were to have their baby die or to have it looked after by the Catholic Church whilst you repaid your debt.  It was a topic was upsetting that was very moving and touching to see but the way that everyone involved with the making and creation of Philomena did an excellent job.

The acting was another strong highlight which complemented the excellent writing, Judi Dench an actress who’s been giving brilliant performances for many decades now and has constantly contributed to British Film shines once more. Her portrayal of Philomena is excellent, the way in which Dench can show frailty, sadness and humour in such a quick mixture is incredible and something which obviously contributed to her deserved Oscar Nomination.  Steve Coogan as Martin Sixsmith is also great, the humour again is a highlight but so is how Coogan deals with the serious scenes and moments. Martin is a character that stands up for Philomena and due to that the audience encourages and sides with him throughout. An honorary mention and one which is probably not as frequent as it should be, but Sophie Kennedy Clark’s performance of a younger Philomena was brilliant. Responsible for the flashback scenes which complemented Philomena’s narration when telling her story Clark’s emotion was a real highlighting aspect.

Philomena is a film that thrives mainly from its acting and strong story, although there was nothing wrong with Frears direction it wasn’t eye-catching enough to be applauded likewise with the film’s score and music. Although elements were lacking you can’t deny that Philomena is a fantastic film which has undoubtedly made a huge impact on all its viewers and has done British Film proud. Entertaining and intriguing from start to finish the experience is easily enjoyable and definitely emotional but more importantly one that is very worth-while.

Advertisements

Night At The Museum (2006)

Genre: Action, Adventure, Comedy

Director: Shawn Levy

Writers: Robert Ben Garant & Thomas Lennon (Screenplay), Milan Trenc (Book)

Staring: Ben Stiller, Dick Van Dyke, Owen Wilson

Rating: ★★★

I remember watching this film as a kid in the cinema and just like most others my age I found it amazing and exciting, seven years later although not as excited and amazed I still very much enjoy it. Night At The Museum has had some really bad and in my opinion unfair reviews, it has a predictable somewhat plain storyline but then again not many films break that mould, what this film does do though is create laughter and give you a new look at history. It has a great cast from Ben Stiller to Owen Wilson and Ricky Gervais and the special effects are what you expect but still of quality. In general this film is very watchable and if you let yourself you will enjoy it and be entertained.

Ben Stiller plays the character of Larry Daley, divorced and unemployed he’s a complete loser but the failed marriage and career doesn’t bother Larry as all he wants to do is be a good father and impress his son, Nick. When finding out he might be getting evicted Nick and Larry are disappointed to say the least but in a desperate need of a job he takes up the vacancy of a night guard at the natural history museum. There’s a saying that at night history comes to life, unfortunately for Larry it just happens to be true. When the sun sets all the museums exhibits come to life, from Rex the dinosaur to cavemen and elephants. After somewhat settling in on the job Larry invites his son to spend a night shift alongside him however the retired guards Larry replaced set out to steal the museums most precious treasures, with the help of the most historic figures Larry must stop the guards and save the museum all before the sun rises.

The supporting cast to Ben Stiller as previously mentioned is outstanding and involves some big names. Owen Wilson and Steve Coogan play to rival figures one being a roman the other a cowboy, the two provide great laughter and some funny scenes. Others such as Robin Williams who takes on the role of Teddy Roosevelt and Ricky Gervais who plays the boss of the museum. The scenes as a kid excited me, seeing a giant dinosaur come to life and play fetch like a dog was amazing not so much now but it still brings a smile and that’s due to the good special effects. Due to the special effects not only does it bring amazement but laughter as some historic characters wreak havoc.

Night At The Museum is very watchable like I’ve said and although really for kids if you let it, you will enjoy this film. The cast is great and this for me is the key to this film, all providing laughs and comical sequences they keeps you entertained. As a kid the dream is there, that you can walk into a museum and it comes to life, as an adult it’s about the special effects and more so the laughter. This was never going to be an iconic film or one that people will watch over and over but it entertains and that’s what its meant to do. Fun, creative and hilarious.