Bad Neighbours (2014)

Genre: Comedy

Director: Nicholas Stoller

Writers: Andrew J. Cohen, Brendan O’Brien

Starring: Seth Rogen, Zac Efron, Rose Byrne, Dave Franco

Rating:★★★★½

Bad Neighbours is a film that I had been eagerly awaiting to watch for some time, a cast filled with comedy-gold and genius, matched by a fun concept shown off brilliantly in a hilarious trailer, had me hook line and sinker for this year’s big comedy release.  I can firmly say that I wasn’t disappointed, huge laughs, unforgettable scenes and Seth Rogen being Seth Rogen, easily made this one of the best comedies I have seen in recent years.  However what also makes Bad Neighbours so great is its refreshing take and twist on a popular and typical genre story, whilst also achieving a sense of familiarity.

Mac (Seth Rogen) and Kelly (Rose Byrne) are new parents, adapting to a somewhat unknown and feared stable lifestyle; managing marriage, having a child, professional jobs and owning a house. However the couple are struggling, missing their youth and the excitement of what seems to be their previous life, despite not even being old. Mac now works at an office where the only joy comes from occasionally smoking weed with his friend Jimmy, whilst Kelly is finding the stay-at-home mum life equally boring and dull. However the pair’s life is soon going to become a reflection of their past and youth as a fraternity moves into the house next door, making the two neighbours. The fraternity, D-Side, is run by president Teddy (Zac Efron) and his vice president Pete (Dave Franco), the two together want to become legendary and make it onto to the wall of fame. Party after party, night after night, Kelly and Mac eventually call the police, however things don’t go to plan and the two neighbours start a war, involving air bag pranks, condoms, fireworks and dildo selling.

The comedy elements to Bad Neighbours are great and the laughs are both huge and consistent, however as previously mentioned there seems to be a deeper and refreshing aspect to its story which is down to some great and well-thought about writing. Mac and Kelly are struggling to adapt with maturing, and despite their hatred for their new neighbours it brings the much missed past youth experience which they seem to soak-up. It was a refreshing take on the adaption and cross-over in life, where usually we see middle-aged couples or teenage dramas it was interesting to see it achieved with those who are still young. Teddy and Pete are likewise fearful of their future and the next step, the thought of what happens next seems to be frightening and they hide behind their Robert De Niro parties. However the bringing together of these two “couples” in a sense help them accept change and embrace their lifestyle.

Bad Neighbours as a comedy however is hilarious. I have not seen a comedy for a long while which has had so many big moments which literally produce gut-busting laughs and a few tears. Despite the trailer somewhat ruining some surprising moments the comedy was genius, whilst also being refreshing and non-cliché. Teddy and Pete steal the airbags out of Mac’s and Kelly’s car, replacing them into various chairs in their house, making them explode when an un-expecting Mac takes a seat. The humour associated around the baby, Stella, is also brilliant, something which although pushes boundaries creates so many laughs. The first time we see our lead characters they are having sex in an attempt to feel young again whilst being conscious of their curious daughter watching from the high-chair, there is also a moment when Stella swallows a condom thrown into the lawn from the frats. The gags are consistent with a nice mixture between slapstick, physical and uncomfortable humour being used, again making it refreshing.

The importance of the lead characters was huge, and the writers deserve some credit however the portrayal by the main cast was great. Seth Rogen for me always produces huge and successful comedies and is one of the funniest and talented comedy actors in present times. He didn’t disappoint with his character of Mac who was hilarious, it was also interesting to see Seth take on a character that had a responsibility too, something he managed well. Zac Efron and Rose Byrne were also good, with solid performances, Kelly’s outbursts of anger were great to watch whilst an angry Teddy was amusing. Dave Franco too deserves credit; his presence brought laughs almost each-time.

There seemed to be a lot of enjoyable things from Bad Neighbours, as a film-lover the in-jokes present throughout added that something extra.  Teddy and Mac, stoned in the early morning decide to debate their favourite Batman Actor whilst making some hilarious impressions, the inclusion of a Robert De Niro party also made me laugh; Dave Franco’s Focker impression was pure gold, “Ay Focker? You’re upsetting Mr Jinxy Cat”

It is really hard to fault this comedy; it really did achieve its aims as I laughed so much, my only criticism comes from the slightly annoying trailer which can ruin some funny moments. I also felt that at times, especially the focus on the Frat parties were unnecessary or dwelled on for too long.

Bad Neighbours will certainly be one of the best comedies this year, and for now it definitely is one of the best comedies I’ve seen in recent years. There is so much more than what can be seen on the surface to this film, with some deep character meanings and development which is handled well by both the cast and writers. The laughs are huge, and some scenes I’m sure will be remembered for ages, along with quotes – “I’m milking a human”, “I put my dick in your mouth when you were asleep, – I was awake” Bad Neighbours is a must-watch, and an easily enjoyable film which deserves a lot of praise and credit.

 

 

 

 

 

Hours (2013)

Genre: Drama, Thriller

Director: Eric Heisserer

Writer: Eric Heisserer

Starring: Paul Walker, Genesis Rodriguez, Nancy Nave

Rating: ★★½

Hours is one of the last films the late Paul Walker filmed before his tragic death, and this unfortunately is one of the reasons this fairly unknown release caught my eye. It’s an innovative thriller, and works well at times, however despite including a great performance from Walker and a slightly new exciting concept, it is very sloppy and badly executed making for a very mixed viewing experience.

The story focuses on Nolan Walker (Paul Walker) who finds himself in the middle of Hurricane Katrina after the birth of his new born daughter. His wife sadly died during the birth process and therefore his new daughter Abigail, named after her mother, is in need of care and is placed in an incubator which provides oxygen and food. The hurricane seems to head towards the hospital and all staff and patients are evacuated, apart from the distraught and deserted Nolan and Abigail. Nolan now has to care for his baby as she fights for her life and defend her from the trouble of the hurricane.  However when the power goes off along with the generators, and the first floors of the hospital flood, Nolan has to find a solution to keep Abigail and the incubator alive as her first days of life become a survival mission.

Hours has a very exciting story and the decreasing and ticking power supply to Abigail’s incubator acts like a bomb in an action film keeping us on edge. However it doesn’t seem to change much throughout the film, as the battle for survival drags on and occasionally changes from the fight for power to the fight for food. It works very well for the first half of the film, but for me it needed developing as it became boring and less intriguing. I was disappointed that the Hurricane itself wasn’t as troublesome, despite its “knock-on” effect on the power it really didn’t make much of an appearance throughout the film. Hours frustratingly too, seemed to have a really bad portrayal of people, which essentially caused more problems for Nolan than the Hurricane, all hospital staff even before the crisis abandon poor Nolan and even his dead wife was left on the floor, also throughout it seemed everyone was unhelpful and this felt over-dramatized despite its attempt to make us feel for Nolan’s situation more.

 Paul Walker’s portrayal of Nolan was very good, and encouraged us to connect for him. His acting was realistic, and the grit, determination and stress which should have been felt by our lead character really came through. Hours however lacked any other characters, which I felt was slightly responsible for the film not being able to develop too much. The directing and effects were very limited, nothing exciting jumped out as a highlight, however it should be said the film looked good for such a modern-day low budget.

Hours had a really good concept, one which at first I was excited by, however it wasn’t developed enough and didn’t reach full potential, with even the climax and ending seeming very dull.  Despite Walker’s strong performance it was a very average film which although was slightly entertaining, feels somewhat un-worthwhile whilst its lack of progress makes it drag and become boring. Hours could have been so much better but sadly it wasn’t, this isn’t the must-watch thriller I was hoping for and Its certainly not something you should rush to see.

 

47 Ronin (2013)

Genre: Action, Adventure, Fantasy

Director: Carl Rinsch

Writers: Chris Morgan, Hossein Amini, Walter Hamada

Starring: Keanu Reeves, Hiroyuki Sanada, Ko Shibasaki

Rating: ★★★

47 Ronin is a film which attempts to take a serious concept and liven it up with fantasy elements to appeal to a wider audience.  It is quite simply an average film, one with much potential, but ultimately I found myself slightly disappointed. The craft is great along with some moments of action, whilst everything else is rather respectable but nothing too special including the return of Keanu Reeves to the world of cinema.

Lord Asano (Min Tanaka) of Ako, a small beautiful Japanese village, is hunting in the forest with his men when they find a young boy, a half-breed between demon and human. Asano sees something special in this boy and takes him home to the castle, where he shall live alongside the samurai. Several years later, the young boy is now a man, his name is Ki (Keanu Reeves) but he’s rejected as a samurai and is labelled as “half-breed”, but his fighting skills are superior to any other, defending the village from beasts. Lord Asano invites the Shogun of Japan (Cary-Hiroyuki Tagawa) to Ako to watch a tournament; however when a witch sabotages his fighter and eventually Asano himself, the shogun demands seppuku (Suicide) on Asano to counterbalance his shameful act. Lord Kira (Tadanobu Asano) of Nagato is given power over Ako by the Shogun, including all the samurai and the princess. Lord Kira, evil and heartless forbids the samurai from Ako and keeps the princess for himself. The banished samurais, who are now just ronins, realise Kira’s plot and set out alongside the half-breed to seek revenge for their fallen master despite it being against the Shogun’s order.

The concept is simple but strong with the story surrounding revenge and the ronin taking back their land of Ako from Lord Kira, who plotted the bewitching. It has also been seen many times before, with an unapproved man attempting to save a village and to win the princess from an evil master. However 47 Ronin steer away from simple plots and attempt to dive into fantasy worlds and monsters to gain excitement. The idea of huge, witch crafted beasts somewhat ruin a traditional concept of samurais against shoguns and masters.  It lets down the film for me and somewhat made it hard for me to like it, especially considering my appreciation for classic Japanese film such as Seven Samurai, where in other films Ki would be a farmer or a peasant, he is a demon setting-up a mythical setting and film world. The fantasy carries on as witches, ghosts and spirits enter the film. 47 Ronin then attempts to make matters serious by making the acquisition that the story is based on real life events, something I found ridiculous.

The real action, when arriving, takes place as the ronin invade Lord Kira’s Ako, and it is very good with the scenes looking great and the attack and scene being well-thought out and executed. It then sets up two stand-off fights, which bring entertainment which is much needed as the film beforehand seems to stray at some points.

Keanu Reeves portrayal of Ki is good, however like the rest of the cast and their acting it isn’t anything special and if anything at times it felt very stereotyped and cheesy.  The film did thrive from its visuals, although the concept of beasts and witches were somewhat unneeded it is only fair to say that they looked good and the effects were brilliant. The directing was also creditable and a standout, some shots were very awe inspiring especially in the lead up to the battle, whilst the film was occasionally helped by a number of well-timed and executed scenery shots.

47 Ronin isn’t what I was expecting, and I would have hoped it took a more traditional approach towards portraying a Japanese samurai story.  The film itself looked good and the action when appearing, although somewhat less than what was needed, was great and provided good action and entertainment. The story was well shaped and the simple concept was strong, which essentially draws you in as an audience; however the twists were really unnecessary. 47 Ronin isn’t anything special at all and doesn’t deserves much praise but on the other hand it could have been a whole lot worse.

Fruitvale Station (2013)

Genre: Biography, Drama

Director: Ryan Coogler

Writer: Ryan Coogler

Starring: Michael B. Jordan, Melonie Diaz, Octavia Spencer

Rating: ★★★★

Fruitvale Station made a lot of noise when it came out around summer time last year and is now set for a release in the UK, for some reason I never really looked out for it or into it, until now, and I can now say the praise this film got, and the noise that was made is totally justifiable. It is moving, and horrific in the sense that this is a true story and the events which occurred happened, and that they do happen in an every day manner.

‘Fruitvale Station is the true story of Oscar Grant, a 22-year-old Bay Area resident who wakes up on the morning of December 31, 2008 and feels something in the air. Not sure what it is, he takes it as a sign to get a head start on his resolutions: being a better son to his mother, whose birthday falls on New Year’s Eve, being a better partner to his girlfriend, who he hasn’t been completely honest with as of late, and being a better father to T, their beautiful 4 year old daughter. He starts out well, but as the day goes on, he realises that change is not going to come easy. He crosses paths with friends, family, and strangers, each exchange showing us that there is much more to Oscar than meets the eye. But it would be his final encounter of the day, with police officers at the Fruitvale BART station that would shake the Bay Area to its very core, and cause the entire nation to be witnesses to the story of Oscar Grant’

The ending to the story is irrelevant in some respect; many before watching would be familiar of such events and the name Oscar Grant, what is relevant is the manner in which this story has been told. It follows Oscar throughout his day, his last day, it allows us to know Oscar, connect and engage. He isn’t as first seen the stereotypical man from a rough part of town, he is caring, he tries. We see his interaction with his mother, something truly heart-warming; we see his interaction with his daughter, something equally as touching. Oscar is trying to turn his life around and make something for himself and everyone that he cares for. As the New Year slowly approaches we have seen the true Oscar, kind and loving, but as he gets the train back home with his girlfriend and a group of friends his past seems to hold him back. A group of police officers, racist and vile, unfairly treat and arrest Oscar and his friends, eventually leading to the unnecessary shooting and the unforgettable murder which was seen from all train members.

The moment is shocking and sad, something very moving and somewhat unexplainable. When watching you feel so much anger, and sorrow, for the whole film we have connected with Oscar and we know what he has to come back to, and look forward to, but in that one moment it is all gone. The writer Ryan Coogler has done amazingly to achieve such emotion, and so have the actors. Michael B. Jordan portrayal of Oscar is brilliant, he was realistic but at the same time moving as we saw his interaction with people throughout the day. The idea that these actors aren’t well-known adds to the realism of this story, or keeps the realism within the true story, and again this creates even more emotion. I usually find portrayals of true events hard to watch as I still believe that it never happened, but this is the complete opposite, and really deserves praise.

Fruitvale Station is an example of a film which thrives of its story, and that is so good because of it. There were flaws, the dialogue at times was hard to handle, and some scenes seemed too on the nose and Hollywood for the true story, whilst nothing equally jumped out as an amazing aspect of craft, but it is hard not to be touched by this film and Oscar’s story. This is a film I am glad I watched, it is excellently portrayed and handled, whilst the rawness adds to keep realism and creates so much emotion. Fruitvale Station is a film with so much emotion. It is not the easiest to watch, but it is powerful and really worthwhile. I strongly believe this film was majorly overlooked and forgotten from last year.

 

 

Fight Club (1999)

Genre: Drama

Director: David Fincher

Writers: Chuck Palahniuk, Jim Uhls

Starring: Brad Pitt, Edward Norton, Helena Bonham Carter

Rating: ★★★★★

Fight Club is something special, a film which is like no others in terms of story, action, characters and the ridiculous detail that has been sweated over to make everything just that extra bit phenomenal. It is a film which amazes you the first time you watch it, and then the second, third, fourth all have the same effect as you start to notice little in-jokes and hidden elements. The writing is great, dialogue beyond great, with the acting, directing and look being completely lovable and “sexy”. Fight Club is definitely a favourite, definitely a classic and definitely a film which deserves every single bit of praise it gets.

Our main focus is Jack (Edward Norton), Jack isn’t his real name, we don’t find out his real name, but will we call him Jack, for Jack sounds better than simply “the narrator”. He is the narrator however, and he tells his story looking back on how he has ended up spitting vowels onto a dirty gun that’s been shoved down his throat. He’s a slave to Ikea, his job and his insomniac mind which will not let him sleep, on the way back from work he arrives to find his condo blazing and his much loved furniture nothing but burnt fragments lying on the floor. He has nothing, everything that he is was in that apartment, and so he rings Tyler (Brad Pitt). Tyler is the most interesting single serving friend Jack has ever met; Tyler sells soap and briefly shared his plane journey with Jack earlier that day and the two meet and Jack stays at Tyler’s house. The lifestyle is different, there is no nice furniture, TV, hot water, yet Jack is happy, he is free. Tyler and Jack create Fight Club, a place where men can be free, where pain is a replacement for fear and violence is a replacement for crying, there is no therapy just fighting. However Fight Club catches on, gets out of control, and soon spirals into Project Mayhem which could spell oblivion, but what it means for Jack is much much more.

Fight Club is mind-blowing in every sense of the word, to tell more of the story is a crime but it withholds one of the greatest plot twists and endings to a film. Jack is a modern-day man; he represents most men, a generation of men which have been raised in a feminist society, but is that right? The film speaks so much, Tyler speaks so much, and when analysed you can see so many ideas and the brilliance behind the concept. The concept of this story is great, two men, Tyler and Jack creating something so simple yet so dangerous and something that is apparently somewhat nature for men. It is much more though than the fighting, Jack and Tyler have a relationship with Marla (Helena Bonham Carter) a lost soul, yet it brings so much excitement and thrill. The story involves humour, everything from the character of ‘Bob’ to fight club homework assignments, then the action with explosions and soap, and finally the mystery, the absolute awe of what has been created and witnessed.

However one of the most likeable aspects of Fight Club is our characters, Jack for starters is just a slave to the world, but what he turns into is very different, rebellious and free we like him and admire him. Tyler is the definition of fun; no-one who sells soap and wears flower suits can be as cool as Tyler. Then Marla, it all starts with Marla, she is witty, and despite neglected she is so important. Brad Pitt is brilliant and so is Edward Norton, they portray their characters flawlessly, Pitt is fun just like Tyler, whilst Norton although more serious is likable and sympathetic just like Jack.

Fight Club is in my opinion the best film Fincher has ever directed and he certainly is remembered for it. The directing is new, and clever, the explosion scene in the condo is a single moment which highlights this alongside the opening title sequence. Fincher creates a dark gloomy look but it complements the exciting characters and story in a strange way. The effects are great, the fighting looks real, the blood looks even more real and the aftermath of “Blondie’s” fight looks brilliant. Everything within Fight Club seems faultless. The score should also be mentioned, its electric feel is needed whilst the end song is somewhat nostalgic to hear, let alone completely complimentary.

Fight Club is unexplainable, once watched more than once your admiration increases. The writing is one of my favourites, from dialogue to the wrapping up of each storyline and plot. The overall product is flawless and there’s no wonder why it is regarded so highly.  It is my favourite performances from both lead actors whilst they are also both of my favourite characters. Fight Club is a classic, and there’s no debating about that.

 

 

 

 

 

Hostel Part II (2007)

Genre: Horror

Director: Eli Roth

Writer: Eli Roth

Starring: Lauren German, Heather Matarazzo, Bijou Phillips

Rating: ★★

Hostel Part II is the second instalment of a not so successful franchise by writer and director Eli Roth. His first and original, Hostel (2005), caused headlines to name It one of the most shocking American films made in the last ten years, with a mixture of extreme gore, violence and sex. Hostel’s sequel similarly follows the same trend, bringing again the gore, sex and violence but investing in a deeper story which replaces the shock previously created. It maybe horror to watch due to the nature of the film but at times the horror comes at the hands of a sloppy and poorly made film.

The story follows a group of three girls as they side-track from a trip to Rome, Beth (Lauren German) the “sensible” character and lead protagonist, who also has a bucket load of money and her friends, Lorna (Heather Matarazzo) the typical shy reserved girl whilst Whitney (Bijou Phillips), the third companion, is the typical whorish slut. As they are distracted by a young Slovakian Model telling them to travel to the outskirts of Bratislava for a spa weekend, they encounter the corrupt town and hostel which saw mass death and torture in the previous film. Unaware the girls are soon brought by three wealthy businessmen and woman waiting to taste their blood.

Hostel II attempts to give us a bigger picture, bigger than what we saw in the first instalment. We seem to have an insight into the way the “elite hunting” organisation is run, with a look into people bidding and those behind the murders. Although it is new and innovated by Roth, it does seem to be that we start to identify with the antagonists and follow their story too much, neglecting our victims. The shock is removed, after watching Hostel we now suspect everyone in the town and we just wait for the killing to start, however it takes a long time with the action only starting after the half-way point. The gore however is a lot more shocking, but less frequent, a way to beat the prequel for Roth seems to be, shoot a kid, chop of a man’s nob and play football with a head.

The effects are good, however we suspect it’s all fake and it just doesn’t have the same “I can’t look” factor, but instead a more comedic over the top element which for me resembled Tarantino’s Kill Bill. Hostel II again unlike the prequel doesn’t seem to be as clever, the directing isn’t as sharp and the cuts between shots which stood out in Hostel seem to be non-existent. A good aspect though, one of the very few, seems to be the sound effects which at times is the only thing which has a scare factor.

There isn’t too much to shout about with this film, everything is average. The acting for me is very average with most of the screen time being filled up with the three girls screaming and being incredibly whiney until a really dramatic change of character in the final scenes, which of course was realistic. The story seems poorly written, its ending seems laughable as it looks like Eli Roth wanted a really quick way to end the situation and move things on. Whilst the opening sequence which follows on from Hostel, is somewhat only there to stop the audience asking questions but essentially it makes the journey of Hostel look pointless, with Eli Roth somewhat shooting himself in the foot as he imagines the potential money he can make.

There is no surprise that Hostel III went to straight to a DVD release after the second instalment of the franchise showed no promising signs at all. Hostel II doesn’t have the same effect as Hostel and tries too hard to change, which essentially ruins its concept, whilst everything is average there is the standout of some gore and sound effects but that’s all. It is most likely a better comedy than a horror which is barely entertaining to watch, with this more than typical film being waste of time and for the most part the torture is afflicted upon the audience who has to watch such a mess unfold.

 

 

Labor Day (2014)

Genre: Drama

Director: Jason Reitman

Writers: Jason Reitman, Joyce Maynard

Starring Kate Winslet, Josh Brolin, Gattlin Griffith

Rating: ★★★

Labor Day is a film which will most likely get overlooked as it dwells in its last weeks of cinema release; but I think that this more than heartfelt drama deserves some recognition and praise. A Jason Reitman adaptation from the award winning novel of the same name written by Joyce Maynard shows a real battle for love and affection which makes for an entertaining and sometimes tense watch which although not flawless, is ultimately worth-while.

The story focuses on Adele (Kate Winslet), a depressed and recently divorced single mother who has become so afraid of the cruel outside world she only leaves her house once a month for supplies. Her son, Henry (Gattlin Griffith), is a growing young teen who is dealing with the changes of his body, his mind and the pressure of dealing with family life. On the monthly trip to the store Henry bumps into Frank (Josh Brolin), a wounded fearsome escaped convict who has jumped out of a second story hospital window; offering him a ride home he stays with Adele and Henry over the Labor Day weekend whilst the police search the town and he recovers. Adele, Frank and even Henry all battle life for the same thing, affection, and this is a film which tells the story of a fight for that affection and much needed love. Adele falls in love with Frank and remembers how it feels to be loved, cared for and touched whilst Henry finds a fatherly role-model, learning baseball and even mechanics. As Frank and Adele learn each other’s lives’ and pasts they realise their need for each other, however no matter how much love they share, Frank is an on the run convict in a very small village.

The story is very heart-warming and very well-written with what I believe is three in-depth characters that really share and connect with the audience. The character of Frank shares the solemn story of why he is in prison, and we see how deep down he is much softer than his looks. Adele shares her tragedies showing herself the victim of a cruel world, however the bonding between these two strangers is pleasant to watch and seems a somewhat fait driven event. Whilst Henry’s story shows a troubled time experienced by far too many young teens in a modern society making a somewhat realistic leap. Labor Day is well executed with eventually the story tracking forward many years into the future, where the narrator (Tobey Maguire ) is now an older Henry. The ending without too many spoilers is a very nice touch to round off the film.

Kate Winslet and Josh Brolin both give very good performance’s showing their years of experience and making the story fulfil its impact upon the audience. However although a rarity, Labor Day offers a superb cast where everyone gives a great performance, Gattlin Griffith for sure, whilst younger versions and older versions of characters also play their part in adding to a real highlight aspect to the release. The direction too by Reitman was good, there were certain moments and scenes which really stood out especially for cinematography as the lighting was very impressive with these sun filled shots which appeared often.

Labor Day however did struggle slightly and created a few sloppy flaws which consequently let the film down. The pace was too slow considering how quickly the main story started; it seemed to drag especially considering the film focused on a four-day weekend. Although it contained tense moments and scenes as the police searched for Frank and unexpected visitors arrived, I felt there was a missing fulfilment of action or a climax which really turned things around. I also found at times the script and writing although good, to be too on the nose and unnecessary, such as Frank playing with and helping a disabled child to show he Is a good and innocent man which was obvious beforehand. I also found confusing how Frank spent lots of time outside, fixing gutters, walls, cars and making barbeques however despite a much closed in village filled with friendly and nosey surrounding neighbours no one spotted him. It felt that there were so many good elements to Labor Day but its attention to small errors and detail essentially for me, marred the film slightly.

Labor Day has an inviting, sad and warm story which it essentially thrives off and despite some flaws I do believe the positives are much greater in value than the negatives. A great portrayal from all the cast provides great performances, especially from our lead roles. Labor Day is entertaining film, maybe not reaching full potential however it is nevertheless a worthwhile watch which I am glad to have experienced.